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Free Brewing Program

I hate to pay for software.  I’m an engineer and a bit of a computer and beer geek.  So, it seemed like a natural eventuality that I would write my own beer program.  I wanted one that I could cater to my individual use.  I also saw various strengths and weaknesses with the commercially available software for purchase.  I wanted to combine the strengths and make a program that I think takes the best features of each one.

I have spent many hours pouring over beer books, equations, charts, formulas, and code to write this program.  I am offering it here for the use and enjoyment of all home brewers because I love home brewers, and so does God!

It is my hope that you will use this tool and pass it on to others.  Please feel free to let me know if you find anything incorrect or come across any bugs.  I can’t promise I will provide support, though. Remember, this is freeware. Be sure to read the system requirements at the end of the page.  The program is based in Microsoft Excel so you will have to have MS Office installed to run it.

Here are some of the powerful features:

  • Easy, user-friendly interface.  Useful for brewers at every stage, beginner to expert.
  • A place to enter your favorite beer recipes and save them to be used later.  Comes pre-loaded with 21 extract, 14 all grain, and 6 partial mash recipes.  Allows you to enter step-by-step directions for each stage of the brewing process.
  • Includes a powerful recipe creation tool that allows you to select from hundreds of ingredients (including over 130 grains and sugars and 64 varieties of hops) and graphically plots how they affect the beer’s gravity, color, and bitterness.  Provides suggested ranges from the BJCP style guide for reference.  Match your favorite beer style.  Tool predicts the beers gravity and shows the beers final color pictorially.
  • Includes a glossary 286 acronyms, beer terms, and brewing lingo with detailed explanation of each term.
  • Allows you to enter brewing notes at every step of the brewing process (mash, boil, fermentation, carbonation, and tasting) and save them to help improve future beers.  Notes page summarizes all the important information for each beer and can be easily printed off or saved electronically to be accessed later.
  • Provides a customizable brewing calendar that allows you to plan out your brewing activity for the year and manage your resources (such as fermentors and kegs).
  • Provides an all grain-to-extract recipe conversion tool.  Automatically converts the all grain recipes you create using the recipe tool to extract recipes, and allows you to choose which one you want to brew.
  • Includes a calculator to calculate amount of hops needed if you substitute different hops to maintain the same bitterness level.  Also converts between whole, pellet, and plug hops.
  • Provides a tool to help plan an all grain mash.  Allows you to pick number of mash steps and rest temperatures.  Calculates the amount of boiling water needed to raise wort to next temperature step.  Automatically generates directions based on your inputs.
  • A useful tool to predict boiling temperature based on local elevation and current atmospheric conditions (requires internet connection).
  • Calculates the amount of mash water needed in order to achieve a desired final volume of beer.
  • Allows you to select water profile based on city or beer style and tells you how much of each mineral additive to add to match the water profile.
  • Includes timers to time your mash and boil.  Timer will count down and tell you when to make additions of hot water, hops or additives.
  • Corrects your gravity measurements for beer temperature.
  • Provides a helpful unit conversion calculator of frequently encountered units.
  • Includes a tool that calculates the amount of yeast needed to ferment the beer.  Allows you to select from over a hundred different yeast strains (including dry and liquid yeast) and provides the properties of that yeast (attenuation, fermentation temp range, and flocculation).
  • Tells you if a yeast starter is needed and what amount of water and DME needed to reach needed yeast cell count.
  • Calculates how many bottles are needed to bottle a volume of beer.  Calculates the amount of beer remaining after a given amount of bottles are filled.
  • Calculates the residual CO2 in the fermented beer and determines the amount of corn sugar or DME needed to reach desired volume of CO2 for natural carbonation.
  • Computes what pressure your kegged beer needs to be stored at in order to achieve desired level of CO2 (accounting for residual CO2) using forced carbonation.
  • Calculates beer characteristics (final gravity, alcohol content, calories and carbs per 12 oz bottle, brewer efficiency, attenuation, etc.).
  • Allows you to enter beer labels and save them in a database.  Labels can be selected, retrieved, and easily printed out.
  • Allows you access to data tables so you can change or modify any data you desire.
  • Customizable front page that lets you place a picture of your Brewery, or whatever you want.
  • Helps you to “Relax, Don’t Worry and Have a Homebrew!”  I’ve done the grunt work for you.

Here are some screen shots of the program:

System Requirements:

  • Computer running Microsoft XP or later
  • At least 520 MB computer memory
  • Intel Pentium 4 or faster
  • Microsoft Office 2000, 2003, 2007, or 2010 (newer versions may work but have not been tested)

DOWNLOAD PROGRAM

The links below are to files stored on an external server.  WordPress wouldn’t let me host the file on their server.

MS Office 2000: Beer_Program v1.1.1B

MS Office 2003: beer_program-v1.1.3

MS Office 2007 or 2010: Beer_Program_v2.1

27 Comments leave one →
  1. Joel permalink
    May 3, 2010 5:34 am

    Looks nice. I have never tried a program for my brewing before. I’ll have to check what we have for MS Office. My wife didn’t like the new version of Word, so brought down the whole suite!

    Someone gave me a book – can’t think of the name right now about Christianity and alchohol. I’m sure you’ve read it.

  2. June 4, 2010 12:13 pm

    Looks nice. I have never tried a program for my brewing before. I’ll have to check what we have for MS Office. My wife didn’t like the new version of Word, so brought down the whole suite!
    +1

  3. June 10, 2010 4:20 pm

    I am a computer science student and I am interested in developing a java application that would be an adaptation that would be platform independent. I love what you have done but since I am a mac user, I have to run a virtualization of windows to use it. The application would be freeware as is yours, and I was wondering if you could be a resource for me while writing. Provide some help with the calculations, if I run into questions. If not, I thank you for the application. I have been playing around with it for a little while and fell in love Great job!

    • philippians1v21 permalink
      June 11, 2010 11:22 am

      Thanks! Sure, that sounds like a great idea. I’d be happy to help in anyway I can. Let me know if and when you have questions. I look forward to seeing the result!

  4. Don permalink
    October 13, 2010 9:49 am

    No files found….is this viable…would like to look at it!

    • philippians1v21 permalink*
      October 13, 2010 2:20 pm

      I fixed a bad link. Try again.

  5. millstone permalink
    October 23, 2010 5:40 am

    getting error message
    File not found

    • millstone permalink
      October 23, 2010 7:16 am

      well, error went away, got the file… thanks

  6. January 27, 2011 1:45 am

    Thank you for sharing! -Linda

  7. Nathan permalink
    April 26, 2011 1:57 pm

    I too would love to check this out but am getting the web page not found error.

    • philippians1v21 permalink*
      April 26, 2011 6:51 pm

      Yeah, for some reason WordPress wouldn’t accept the file. I had to link to a hosting service outside WordPress. It should work now. Just right click on the file and click “save link as”. Sorry for the inconvenience.

  8. September 26, 2011 7:35 pm

    I am a computer science student and I am interested in developing a java application that would be an adaptation that would be platform independent. I love what you have done but since I am a mac user, I have to run a virtualization of windows to use it. The application would be freeware as is yours, and I was wondering if you could be a resource for me while writing. Provide some help with the calculations, if I run into questions. If not, I thank you for the application. I have been playing around with it for a little while and fell in love Great job!
    +1

    • philippians1v21 permalink*
      September 27, 2011 10:12 am

      Barny,
      Absolutely. Feel free. Let me know if I can help at all.

  9. November 20, 2011 8:51 am

    I have been checking out many of your posts and i can state pretty good stuff. I will make sure to bookmark your website.

  10. November 21, 2011 1:35 am

    My friend and I thought thats a well written blog very happy. Thank you so much.

  11. Kyle permalink
    July 30, 2013 7:55 pm

    Clicked on Download link for Office 2003, says “no such file exists”. Looks like an interesting and helpful program. Is there anywhere else i can download it? Thanks.

    • philippians1v21 permalink*
      July 30, 2013 11:10 pm

      I had to find a new host for the file. All the links should work now. God bless.

  12. adammathews permalink
    December 23, 2013 6:03 pm

    Can I use this software for my shop’s recipe builder and have it placed on my webiste? If so, can you add a section where the homebrew can email me their recipe?
    Adam
    Adam@backyardhomebrewers.com

  13. adammathews permalink
    December 23, 2013 6:05 pm

    Can I use this softwear for my HB shop recipe builder and place it on my shop’s website? If so, can you add a section where the HBer can email me their recipe?
    Adam
    backyard home brewers
    Thanks

    • philippians1v21 permalink*
      December 28, 2013 10:11 am

      Adam,
      You can certainly use the software for your HB store. I will have to see about adding a feature to email the recipe file to you. That would take a little programming work and I’m kind of busy right now. We have a new baby in my family. I’ll see what I can do.

      • adammathews permalink
        December 28, 2013 10:41 am

        Thanks for the response. Congrats and the little one. Is this the first? I completely understand, I have a 1 and 4 year old.
        Per the recipe builder- is it a program that has to be downloaded or can it be embedded into my website?

  14. Ash permalink
    May 10, 2014 6:00 pm

    Very cool. Can we expect an app??

  15. Ryan permalink
    December 5, 2014 9:00 pm

    any chance this will be re-posted for D/L? Or is there a direct link?

    • philippians1v21 permalink*
      December 5, 2014 9:20 pm

      Sorry about that Ryan. I updated the links. They should work now.

  16. John permalink
    March 14, 2015 6:50 am

    Would someone be able to convert this recipe to extract and email to me? Jracine64@gmail.com
    Grains:
    8.5 lbs. – 2-row pale malt
    1 lb. – Caramel (120L)
    1/2 lb. – Carapils (dextrin malt)
    1/8 lb. – Roasted Barley
    1/8 lb. – Chocolate malt
    Hops:
    1/2 oz. (90 min. for bittering) – Northern Brewer (8% alpha acid – 21% util)
    1 oz. (90 min. for bittering) – Cascades (5% alpha acid – 21% util)
    1/2 oz. (30 min. for flavoring) – Cascades (5% alpha acid – 11% util)
    1/2 oz. (10 min. for aroma) – Fuggles
    1/2 (end of boil for aroma) – Fuggles
    approx. 31 – IBU (International Bittering Units)
    Water Treatment: (adjust with salts to approximate depending on water analysis)
    30 ppm – Calcium
    100 ppm – Sulfate
    30 ppm – Chloride
    Mash Temperature: 160°F
    Original Gravity: 1060
    Terminal Gravity: 1016
    3/4 lb. – Clover honey, pasteurized and added to fermentation according to prescribed method

    • philippians1v21 permalink*
      March 15, 2015 6:25 pm

      John,
      I’d be happy to do that for you. The first thing that I notice is that in order to get an OG of 1.060, whoever made that beer had an 84% Brewing Efficiency with that recipe. That’s a little high for an all-grain batch, but since it has 3/4 lb of honey in it, that probably makes sense.

      Here is what I would suggest for the extract version. I am assuming a 93% efficiency for an extract batch (that’s about what I do with my setup). I am assuming you can use a grain bag and steep some grains along with the extract.

      8.2 lbs Amber Liquid Malt Extract
      0.75 lbs Clover Honey
      0.3 lbs 120L Crystal Malt (steeped)
      0.5 lbs Carapils (steeped)
      0.13 lbs Roasted Barley (steeped)
      0.13 lbs Chocolate Malt (steeped)

      If you are wanting an easier recipe without any steeping grains, the alternative version below should also get you pretty close. It might not have the body and mouthfeel of the other version (without the carapils) but this should be as close as possible with no steeping grains:

      2 lbs Pale Liquid Malt Extract
      7 lbs Dark Liquid Malt Extract
      0.75 lbs Clover Honey

      Both of the above recipes will achieve an SRM of approximately 19, which is the same color as the original recipe.

      With the hops schedule you specified and a 1.060 OG, I come out with about 36 IBU. To get the target 31 IBU I recommend dialing the first addition of Cascades back to 0.7 ounce instead 1 ounce.

      Good luck, and let me know which one you do and how your American Honey Brown Ale turns out!

      God bless you,
      Jake M.

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